May 23, 2018

Mother’s Day it’s a REAL Love Story…

Posted on May 4, 2018 by in Magazine Issues

Join us this month as we discover what REAL love is, CLICK HERE.

As always, please feel free to share the magazine with anyone you know that needs some encouragement today. It’s FREE and Good News is always better than the alternative.

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An Adorned Old Warhorse

Posted on March 23, 2018 by in Sittin' At The Gun Shop

Some people like to change and customize things. Most of the time I don’t fall into this category, but on this one particular pistol, I jumped off the deep end too. I floundered around a little, but not too much because I couldn’t afford to drown, (in debt that is). I’m talking about taking a box stock pistol and adding all of the bells and whistles to make it the crème de la cream of the day. It’s a bit of keeping up with the Jones you might say.

This Colt Combat Commander started life as a box stock Colt .45 acp caliber, four and a half inch barrel, single action bullet launcher perfectly capable of doing its job. When it came into my possession it had suffered some abuse. It had some surface rust and was in need of a good cleaning. Naturally, I took it to the gun shop and spoke with the shop’s gun cleaning guru, the manager named Frank.

While cleaning it up for me he said that it had good bones, but like a teenager on a diet of french fries, the skin was blemished. We talked and finally decided that the old warhorse would be sent off for what was called at the time a satin nickel finish, (now it’s called Colt Guard or matte finish). The older Colt single action semi-auto’s had a habit of skinning the hide off the web of my hand when fired, so I also added an extended beaver tail grip safety too.

As the photograph indicates the chosen grip safety doesn’t have the currently “in fad” speed bump on the lower part. It wasn’t known about or thought of way back then. The sights are fixed and squared off with a wide notch white outlined rear sight and a blaze orange ramp front sight. I had cut my fledgling law enforcement teeth on the N-frame and K-frame Smith and Wesson revolvers and had grown accustomed to this particular sight picture.

I think the brand name for these sights are Millet and they are probably still offered in their current catalog. I bought the finger groove hand filling stocks at the Pasadena Gun show a half decade later and felt that they gave me good control and they felt very natural in my hand. I shot the gun for many years and it would shoot better groups than I could ever muster with any other 1911. At combat distances it would make one ragged hole in the target with a steady hold and quality ammo.

Back in 1990 I was moved into the criminal investigation division and really fell hard for that type of work and the camaraderie of my fellow blood hounds. One thing about it bothered me though; we didn’t have a distinctive badge that identified us as detectives. We all had our regular issue badges that had the word PATROLMAN, emblazoned across the top.

Being somewhat of a trendsetter I went to the Blackington Badge Catalog and ordered what was called a mini-badge in the shape of my current badge with the State of Texas Seal and the department name and my badge number, but I had the title INVESTIGATOR put across the top. I believed this was more befitting a lawman of my stature and assignment.

When it came in I carried it in my wallet for several years. Within a few months after several inter-office memorandums between me and the CID sergeant, we got full size new badges approved for everyone. Many thanks to a great sack dragging detective, (who shall remain nameless) who found a citizen willing to foot the entire bill for the ten new gold tone expensive badges. We got our new shiny DETECTIVE badges that they still wear today because of the kindness of one man, who shall also remain nameless.

After I retired I went to the gun shop with this pistol because the Rampant Colt stock insert had come unglued. I also took the little investigator mini-badge with me to see Frank and asked him if he could carve out the wooden stocks enough to affix the little badge to them. He did it and it turned out to be an attractive addition in my opinion. Now the old warhorse is used as my training gun.

Once shooters that I’m working with get over their fear of recoil, I can train them with the old .45 quicker than anything else I own. They gain confidence quickly due to the higher hit probability and it just feels good in their hand. I hope you like the photograph, and just for your information I could have bought a brand new Colt Lightweight Commander for what it cost me to make these “custom” additions to this pistol. Oh wait, “I recently did just that”. Guess that will be another story.

Till then “shoot back first”, “make sure of your target”, and “may all of your groups be small”. And don’t forget to join the NRA to protect your gun rights.

Junior’s Boy

 

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The Way Back

Posted on March 13, 2018 by in Movie Reviews

Rating: A-

*Our NEW Rating System: A is excellent, B is good and anything less than that doesn’t get talked about here, because there’s nothing good to say.

Audience: Adults only.

There are very adult themes in this movie, savagery, political persecution, murder, friendship, love, and honor. It is not for the faint of heart or squeamish.

“FREEDOM is NEVER FREE” is the main theme of this movie and it shows that REAL men will die trying to stand up on free ground, rather than survive on bent knees in a mad man’s prison.

This movie begins at a terrible gulag (prison camp) in Stalin’s Soviet Union. The main character is a new fish (convict) just learning to tread water in a shark infested pond. He learns a few things from the old cons around him and slowly forms necessary alliances. Not friendships mind you, (these people would murder you in your sleep for a pork chop), but alliances that might help him escape the frozen hell-hole. The Siberian gulag is surrounded by 2000 square miles of snow, frozen ground, and plenty of locals that would turn them in for the bounty paid for escaping prisoners.

Unbelievable hardships plague the escapees during the cross country trek and death stalks their every step. One can pick out the reasons that we now call the men and women of this era the greatest generation. The scenery in this movie is breathtaking, but it’s extremely dangerous for even for the hardiest of them.

The movie ends well and their trip was well worth it.

Junior’s Boy

Showing: Now showing on Netflix.

Starring: Jim Sturgess, Ed Harris, Colin Ferrell and Saoirse Ronan.

 

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Wind River

Posted on February 12, 2018 by in Movie Reviews

Rating: B+

*Our NEW Rating System: A is excellent, B is good and anything less than that doesn’t get talked about here, because there’s nothing good to say.

Audience: *Adults only, graphic violence, language, death scenes, etc.

The movie begins with a young Native American Arapaho Indian girl running through the snow. You can tell by the intensity of her frantic breathing, the speed of her running and the look on her face that she is running for her life. And you can tell that this isn’t going to end well for her. The next scene is a small flock of goats being stalked by a trio of wolves and just as one of them heads toward the innocent young goats, a sharp crack rings out. This is a metaphor of things to come. Two of the wolves go down and then you see the shooter, clad in a white winter hunting suit laying prone in the snow.

He’s holding a sniper rifle that any Delta Force tier one operator would be comfortable using in battle. You can’t tell at this point if he’s a good guy or a bad guy. It turns out that he is a Wildlife Officer working for the State of Wyoming. Next, he finds the corpse of the Indian girl and he’s visibly moved by her death for a reason that becomes clear later in the movie.

A grizzled old reservation Chief of Police is called to the scene and he explains that he doesn’t have jurisdiction in murder cases on the reservation. He will have to call the FBI to investigate this murder and as if on cue – a blizzard starts dumping snow on the crime scene. The Police Chief says he can’t move the body until the FBI gives their approval, so they go to the station to wait and watch the snow fall. A new Chevy Tahoe drives up and a very young, blonde, white female in a lightweight FBI windbreaker jumps out.

The chief, the wildlife officer (WLO), and a local hanger on look at each other in total disbelief. The attractive twenty something agent asks them to be taken to the crime scene to view the corpse. The WLO explains to her that the crime scene is about five miles away by snowmobile and she would likely freeze to death before they got there. The petite young agent is loaned a winter snowsuit and the investigation continues in a normal manner, however the weather and the remoteness of the area continue to be big factors that normal crime scenes don’t have.

This as far as I’m comfortable taking you in this story, but of you like a good murder mystery coupled with beautiful scenery, this is a movie you should watch.

Junior’s Boy

Showing: At a Redbox kiosk near you.

Starring: Elizabeth Olsen as FBI Agent Jane Banner and Jeremy Renner as WLO Cody Lambert.

The Wind River Indian reservation really exists in Wyoming. It is home to members of the Arapaho and Eastern Shoshone tribe. It’s a beautiful and wild mountainous area, but for the indigenous Native American people it’s an unfenced prison without jobs, schooling, or any hope. What they do have in abundance is drugs, crime, death, snow and silence.

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Good News FALL Issue

Posted on October 28, 2016 by in Magazine Issues

Join us this month as we explore a TEXAS state park and celebrate autumn finally arriving in the south!

You can enjoy the Good News in several ways:

1. If you want to BINGE read only good stuff CLICK around the website & read or download everything that looks interesting.

2. Open each issue of the magazine and leisurely scroll through. (Preferably with coffee in your other hand.)

3. Or if you want Good News to arrive in your inbox most every week, just subscribe to the Good News – it’s totally FREE! (CLICK HERE.)

Take a look at the FALL issue by CLICKING HERE.

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Raccoon Hunting With a Cannon

Posted on May 6, 2016 by in Sittin' At The Gun Shop

 

 

Known to action moviegoers as the “most powerful handgun in the world” that would take your head right off your shoulders, the Smith and Wesson .44 caliber magnum revolver is indeed a powerful handgun. I’ve only owned one in my career, but when I carried it I felt as though I was the mightiest warrior walking the face of the planet, afraid of neither man nor beast.

The time was the late 1970’s and I was nineteen years old. I was armed with this hand cannon and I had the authority to use it. That my friends is a scary thought, even to me. Now days you must be twenty one, undergo a battery of both mental and physical evaluations and successfully complete an approved police academy of at least 1600 classroom hours. Back when I started you were sworn in, handed a badge and a gun and told to go get the bad guys. Barney Fife was on TV and I had that role model and 80 hours of reserve officer training to work with.

Sometime in the next twelve months I had to complete a basic 240 hour police academy with a passing grade of 70% to get my peace officer license from the great State of Texas. Anyway back to the Model #29. This particular gun came from a very highly respected and wise old Sergeant named Lindsey Carlton of the League City Police department. He was in my opinion a top notch cop and a good friend to me. This was back in the time of the “wonder nine” pistols. These were high capacity auto loading pistols that were becoming very popular in law enforcement circles and I had already bought myself one. It was a 9mm blued version and I think it had a 15 round magazine. As usual I didn’t really think through my purchase and soon found that the back strap of the weapon that has the most contact with your sweaty palm had started to show signs of rust.

Sgt. Carlton was a big fellow and he had an affinity for large bore revolvers, however he also wanted my S & W model #59, so we worked out a trade. For some reason during our phone conversation about the deal he mistakenly believed that my model #59 was the hard chromed version. I am absolutely sure I didn’t lie to the man, because I respected him way too much for that and that wasn’t something that I could have hidden anyway. Well I trekked over to his house, (a palatial mansion for the day on a cops salary I thought), and we went about the dickering process. I un-wrapped the model #59 from the original brown waxed paper that protected it from rust, in the blue and silver trimmed Smith and Wesson box that had accompanied it from the factory of its birth. A normally jovial type person, I was surprised when I saw Lindsey’s face take on a sour look. He said, “I thought you told me that this was a Nickel plated model?” I stammered and stuttered and vehemently denied that I’d said it was nickel plated during our phone conservation, because I honestly think I told him what it was.

We dickered back and forth like an experienced horse trader and a wanna be cowboy there for a while as Lindsey scrutinized the Model #59 and I went over the Model #29. It had a short barrel of about 4″ and was quite heavy. What first caught my attention was the finish on the hand cannon. It wasn’t new by any stretch of the imagination and had been refinished. Now days it would be called a matte chrome finish or Colt fans would call it a Colt Guard finish. The #29 had the standard factory wooden stocks and a white outline rear sight and the blaze ramp style front sight that I’d already decided I liked in my short law enforcement tenure. Well it took a full glass of sweet tea, one blued Smith and Wesson Model #59 still in the original box and 75.00 hard earned extra job dollars (that my new Boss wasn’t aware I had squirreled away), but I had my model #29 and was on my way.

I went home and showed the new prize to the quite pregnant Boss and she wasn’t all that impressed. I don’t really think she had ever seen a “Dirty Harry” movie at that time, so she had no idea of the cool factor I had just achieved. Well when you get a new gun, you have to buy ammo for it so we loaded up in the family car, a 3/4 ton Chevy single cab pick-up truck that I had owned when we married. The Boss was multi-talented and could drive the manual transmission hay hauler with no problems, but as unborn #1 child grew that all changed, but that’s another story. Off to Marburger’s Sporting Goods we went, where I “badged” the clerk and he didn’t check my age. I bought a fifty round box of 240 grain Remington .44 magnum hollow point cannon ammo. Ok, now what’s any self respecting new gun owner with a box of fresh ammo first priority? To go shoot the damn thing and see how it works.

Back then we were newly married and the Boss was game for most anything, so we drove back to one of the most remote areas in Seabrook on Port road. There was nothing out there but pasture, so I wasn’t afraid of damaging anything. We drove out and parked along side of the road and with the Boss waiting in the truck acting as the lookout, I test fired the .44 by shooting into a bar ditch. I warned the Boss to hold her ears because I assumed it would be loud and I wasn’t disappointed. I touched off a round and a blue and yellow flame bellowed out of that weapon for what the Boss assured me was about 18″. Remember I hadn’t had any formal training on handguns at this point, so I didn’t know about sound deadening ear plugs or ear muffs that you’re supposed to wear when you shoot. I was raised in the country, you just went shooting. For the next round I kind of used my shoulder to protect one ear and stuck my left index finger in the other ear and I made the mistake of shooting the mighty Model #29 with one hand.

I was not too long out of high school where my favorite class was recess. During recess all I was required to do was lift weights and get ready for the next football season, so I got away with firing the nard kicking short barrel hand cannon once. I assure you, I never fired it one handed again though. It was for sure a two fisted handgun, especially with magnum loads. Well now that I was armed with what I called “Thor’s Hammer”, I feared no man or critter. Feeling that I had the power of the mighty Greek God “Thor” and the blessing of the Lord Jesus Christ at my beck and call, I was good to go. So being the “I gotta have the latest and best kinda of cop” that I am, I set about acquiring all of the latest accruements for my new handgun. Back then we all wore either plain black leather or basketweave designed Sam Browns (gun belt), so this called for a trip to Houston to the F-15 police supply on Washington Avenue.

I bought a high rise lined thumb break plain black leather holster and a loop type ammo holder. (That’s a device that held 12 rounds of ammo on your gun belt and allowed you quick access for reloading.) I was now loaded for bear. I carried this gun for many months until the time came that I had to use it. Don’t panic I didn’t kill anybody; I was forced to shoot a raccoon. By forced, I mean that I had gotten a direct order to shoot this raccoon from the Chief of Police. I was aware of the penetrating power of the .44 magnum round. We were in an urban setting, but a citizen called the Chief and said that he had a problem with raccoons in his attic. So being the night officer I was sent over to shoot this raccoon.

Here’s what happened.

The homeowner and I were standing in the yard on the side of his house in an overgrown field. He pointed up to his attic and said “that’s where they will come out when I use a mop handle to make noise and drive them out”. I explained that I would not shoot towards his house, but if he would scare the raccoons out of the attic I’d take the shot if I got the chance. Well sure enough a big ole boar raccoon came out of the attic and jumped across onto a tree limb out near where I was standing. The homeowner returned and I asked him to hold my flashlight on the raccoon so I could shoot it. Well this wasn’t such a good idea because I realized without the flashlight, I couldn’t see the sights on the big Smith and Wesson. By this time I had watched enough T. J. Hooker episodes on television that I managed to hold the flashlight in my left hand and the revolver in my right, using the opposing force hold to brace my gun. I thumbed cocked the big cannon into the single action mode and took careful aim.

Ka-Boom.

Flames and smoke belched out of the muzzle and I could see that I had hit the big old raccoon in the stomach area because that portion of his body was no longer there. I had heard old men tell me that there was no critter as tough as a old boar raccoon, but I couldn’t believe what I saw next. The ole raccoon simply climbed down out of the tree, sneered at us, calmly walked over and climbed over a six foot chain link fence, then disappeared into the woods. People have asked me why I didn’t shoot again, but remember we were in an urban district and shooting horizontally would almost guarantee hitting someone’s house, so I chose to be careful despite what the Chief had told me. By the way that was the last raccoon call I made there, so apparently the ole boy was mortally wounded.

I kept my pet hand cannon till I moved to a larger department that mandated revolvers no larger than a .357 magnum, but I sure missed “Thor’s Hammer”. It was my first Model 29 and due to my retirement and advanced arthritis, it’s probably my last. Till next time grip it with both hands, aim true, and join the NRA to protect your gun rights. If you like this column you can email me at juniorsboy@santafegoodnews.com because the Boss likes it when I get fan mail.
Juniors Boy

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Gratefulness

Posted on November 19, 2015 by in Magazine Issues

Gratefulness is sharing our lives with those we love.

We have so much to be grateful for… please SHARE this issue with anyone who needs to be reminded how blessed they are.

 

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The Good Life is…

Posted on October 23, 2015 by in Magazine Issues

The Good Life is… letting our spirit live in the forefront of our lives!

Join us this issue & please feel free to share the magazine with anyone you know that needs some encouragement. 

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Summertime Fun!

Posted on August 25, 2015 by in Magazine Issues

Summertime FUN has been created just for you! Please enjoy & feel free to SHARE it with anyone who needs some encouragement today!

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Making the GOOD LIFE a Reality…

Posted on June 9, 2015 by in Magazine Issues

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Please enjoy our Special Feature on the GOOD LIFE in this issue. We exist to encourage people to grab life with both hands & help each other along the long road home.

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