July 19, 2018

Let’s Go Somewhere!

Posted on June 1, 2018 by in Magazine Issues

As always if you know someone who needs some encouragement, please SHARE. There is no obligation to buy anything and we don’t have privacy notices, because we don’t share anyone’s information with anyone.

Click HERE to join us for some GREAT summer trip ideas, because sometimes you just need to get away!

 

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Justice For All

Posted on May 31, 2018 by in Sittin' At The Gun Shop

In lieu of reviewing another great gun this month, which we thought would be in bad taste given the current climate… we decided to talk about JUSTICE here instead. The opinions below are our own and they are not meant to offend anyone, but as long as we still have the right to voice our opinions publicly – we will.

We have created a culture that allows “any type of behavior”. We no longer have standards for common decency in our country because no one wants to offend anyone for fear they will be bullied for their opinion.

Common decency is behavior that conforms to accepted standards of morality or respectability.

People don’t talk about hell much anymore, but it exists and perhaps that is part of the problem. We don’t talk about the consequences of our choices and actions. We all make choices and all choices have consequences. If you’re going to demand that something be done to protect our children – demand harsher legislation for the people and children who choose to harm our children.

Insane or not, bullied or not, mistreated as a child or not – if you cause harm to yourself or others – you need to be removed from the general population. Everyone matters, everyone has rights and everyone makes choices that affect the lives of other people. Harming innocent people is wrong and should have consequences sufficient enough to deter others from wanting to suffer the same fate. Crime will not stop until the punishment is sufficient enough to deter the copycats, the people too lazy to do honest work for a living and all of the other people who choose not to live by society’s rules.

I’m not saying we should bring back the chain gangs or treat anyone cruelly, but our prison system is NOT working when people are willing to return there 3 or 4 times for the same crimes. We have given more rights and benefits to the convicted criminal than we have to their victims. The laws protect them more so than the innocent people they harm. Everyone matters and everyone deserves to be treated decently, however we cannot fail to punish by means of separation and removal of certain rights from those who commit crimes.

Law means nothing if it is not supported by punishment sufficient to discourage the crime.

This man/child who chose to harm all of the people in Santa Fe Texas deserves to suffer the consequences of his actions. Right now those consequences are not near severe enough to suit the severity of the crime. This is the change that is needed to lessen the frequency of school shootings and all crimes.

Right is right and wrong is still wrong.

When you harm someone there need not be any gray area. It’s wrong. It doesn’t matter whether it’s done by men, women or children by means of guns, DWI or abortion – you have harmed someone and it’s wrong. It doesn’t matter why you did what you did – you can’t justify why your crime is ok. It doesn’t matter if the victim is 30 weeks old, 6 years old, or 41 – you harmed them and it’s wrong. There needs to be consequences. When there are not sufficient consequences – everyone just does whatever they please.

We should be calling for changes in our prison system.

  • Life should mean life without parole.

  • We need to do away with “good time”.

  • Habitual criminals should not be released.

We pay for televisions, wages (if they work at all) and conjugal visits for people who harm innocent people, really? How dumb is that? Our prison system is a multi-million dollar business. Whose dollars do you think they are? We need to stand up for the innocent people who are no longer here to stand up for themselves. And we need to advertise the heck out of it! Harm anyone and you will receive the harshest sentence allowed by law. In the words of Merle Haggard “the joint used to be a bad place to be” and we need to bring that back.

NATIONWIDE prison reform, prayer and people raising decent children are GOOD places to start.

If you would like to do something TODAY – write or call the Governor of your state and ask for stiffer penalties. We have included a SAMPLE letter below that you can use as is, add to or create your own from and you can go to sleep tonight knowing that YOU at least tried to do something to change our society.

___________

Dear Governor,

In light of the latest school shooting, I would like you to consider using your power and connections to encourage the following:

Prison reform.

(Stiffer sentences, eliminating “good time” and parole of habitual offenders.)

And advertisement of the stricter CONSEQUENCES for those who cause harm to others for any reason.

___________

If you’re going to stand up for something – stand up for consequences.

 

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Mother’s Day it’s a REAL Love Story…

Posted on May 4, 2018 by in Magazine Issues

Join us this month as we discover what REAL love is, CLICK HERE.

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The Way Things Were Back Then…

Posted on January 9, 2018 by in Sittin' At The Gun Shop

In my long and storied past there have been many a handgun come and go, but there is one I deeply regret no longer owning. It’s the fabled Smith and Wesson Model #27 .357 magnum revolver. It was a beautiful bright blue N-framed powerhouse with a five inch barrel. I loved it.

It had a serrated target trigger and the extra wide target hammer, with a white outlined adjustable rear sight and a blaze orange ramped front sight. The bluing was deep and rich and looked as if it was always coated with a fine sheen of oil. On the top of the back strap there was some fine stippling to break up glare along the sighting plane. There were lines machined into the top of the barrel that also served to prevent glare. The stocks were the hand filling deep rich wood variety with the gold colored S & W emblem inset near the center.

At the time, this revolver was the Cadillac of the Smith and Wesson line. I was a big fan of the Dirty Harry movies and considered them to be my training films. In the movies Harry Callahan carried the infamous Model #29, 44 magnum with a 6 1/2 inch barrel. I didn’t feel like I could handle that much gun at that time, so I opted for the shorter barrel, but needless to say that five inch barrel was going to cause me many problems.

No one, I repeat with gusto, NO ONE had a holster that would fit this gun, it was such an odd duck. The model #27 could be ordered with a 3″ – 4″ – 5″ – 6 1/2″ and an 8 3/8″ barrel. There were many N-framed holsters for a four inch barrel around that met my needs, but absolutely none for the five inch version. I finally found a black swivel holster that the big gun would fit in, or so I thought.

This swivel holster attached to your gun-belt in the normal fashion and then reinforced leather went down a ways to a metal swivel. Below the swivel was a holster that had a leather strap that is supposed to hold the gun in the holster. I had seen all the TV shows like Adam-12 and I just knew that the LA police department used this style of a holster and if it worked for them, it would work for me.

So I went to work the next day and immediately realized there was a problem. Wearing a holster that held the handgun below your waist line made your weight press the weapon into your leg. This made for a most uncomfortable ride in the patrol car all day. Not long after I got the holster I was out of my patrol car pushing a stalled car out of the road when my beautiful new gun fell out of it and made a sickening sound as it skidded across the blacktop, scarring it forever.

The next day I called F-15 (a police supply house in Houston) and ordered a high rise, lined holster with a thumb break for the model #27. Although I never fired this particular gun, I carried it on duty at all times. (It’s hard to believe now that we didn’t train with our weapons at all back then.)

I was careful to wipe it down every day to keep it from rusting. Eventually though it started to show signs of rust on the back-strap. Being a neophyte I had failed to remove the stocks and apply gun oil to the frame and grip area, so rust abounded there. I cleaned it up and vowed never to forget that area of cleaning again.

Hoover Info

This Model #27 helped me make my first felony arrest.

It was a hot summer day and I was in my patrol car parked under a large oak tree in the parking lot of the Red Barn. For you local folks you’ll remember that the Red Barn was a large dance hall located in Kemah on Highway 146. The oak tree is still there, but the Red Barn is long gone and has been replaced by a Texas First Bank building. I was about twenty at the time and I had written lots of traffic tickets and made a few misdemeanor arrests, but never a felony.

Anyway, as I was watching traffic a car came south from the Seabrook side and made a quick right turn onto FM 518. Now I had my radar set up on FM 518 and the posted speed limit was 45 miles per hour. I watched the numbers on the digital display rise quickly and when it reached 59, I locked it on the screen. I started the patrol unit, (a Ford LTD II) and activated my overhead lights and siren and began chasing this speeder down.

The overhead lights on this old Ford were of the chain driven cherries type. That means that one side had an electric motor that drove a bicycle chain that rotated the light on the other side of the car. I used the chrome exterior of the spotlight to check and make sure that the lights were rotating, because sometimes only one side rotated. Sure enough the driver’s side wasn’t rotating, so I reached up with my left hand and gave it a sharp whack. Now remember, I was chasing a speeder in a marked patrol car doing about 70 mph and having to reach my hand out of the window and whack the light bar to make it rotate, so the speeder could see it. This was multitasking long before it was popular to do so.

I whacked it several times and it started working, so I focused my attention back on the targeted speeder. He drove down FM 518 towards a curve in the road. On one side there was a paved road and on the other side of the intersection there was a gravel driveway. I was reaching down to grab the microphone to check out on the radio when the Seabrook dispatcher started broadcasting a BOLO.

She described the vehicle and gave the license plate number. Excitedly, I got on the radio and said, “243 Seabrook, I got it, I got it”! I caught my breath and told her that I was in pursuit of the wanted vehicle and that I was headed west on FM 518 headed towards League City. She said that the suspect was a white male that had just stolen a purse containing a lot of money from a parked car on the Seabrook side. All this happened within a few seconds.

My adrenalin was very high at this point to say the least. The suspect vehicle made a hard right turn into the long gravel driveway, trying to elude me. Gravel and dust was flying everywhere and the driveway ended in the front yard of a home about a quarter mile from the paved FM road.

The suspect stopped his car and I slid my patrol unit in behind him in my best Hollywood slide and swung open the driver’s side door. Keeping my feet inside of the car I pulled out the big Model #27 and in a very loud voice explained that if his didn’t stop that I was going to remove his head from his body with the big gun.

Apparently he had seen some Dirty Harry too, because he immediately stopped and laid down on the ground. Before I even got out of the car I grabbed the radio and made sure that Seabrook knew where I was at and requested a back up unit.

I approached the prone suspect and repeated my instructions that he not move. To emphasize my instructions, I thumb cocked the double action behemoth revolver into the single action mode just like I had seen Harry Callahan do so many times. Anyway I got the frightened suspect handcuffed and stuffed into the back seat of my patrol car.

I returned to the suspect vehicle and I saw the purse he had stolen laying there on the back seat. I secured the purse and waited for the Seabrook police to arrive on the scene. Once they arrived I turned the suspect, the stolen purse, and the suspect vehicle over to them. I noted the incident in my patrol log and went out to catch more speeders.

The next day I got called into the Captain’s office. He told me that I should have searched the suspect’s vehicle. Seabrook PD found stolen items from eight home burglaries, over twenty pounds of marijuana, and three stolen guns. He asked me why I didn’t search the car. I told him that it was a Seabrook wanted vehicle and as far as I knew it hadn’t committed any crimes in Kemah.

He knew that I hadn’t yet been to the police academy at that time, so he wrote my actions off to inexperience. Later though, the wise old Chief of Police approached me and he said that what I did was exactly what he would have done in the same situation and that made me feel a little better. (Again, hard to believe you could go out and imitate Dirty Harry without ever having been professionally trained at all.)

As the rust on the grip handle of the Model #27 increased, my desire for something better grew too. Within a few months Smith and Wesson released a Model #66 stainless steel K-framed .357 magnum revolver. The Model #27 along with some hard earned extra job money to boot bought me a new rust resistant sidearm.

In my opinion the Model #27 of that era is on par with the Colt python. That’s another story that I’ll share with you in the future. Till next time, shoot straight, shoot often, and support the NRA to protect your 2nd amendment rights to bear arms.

Junior’s Boy

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gunPhotofor January

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Raccoon Hunting With a Cannon

Posted on May 6, 2016 by in Sittin' At The Gun Shop

 

 

Known to action moviegoers as the “most powerful handgun in the world” that would take your head right off your shoulders, the Smith and Wesson .44 caliber magnum revolver is indeed a powerful handgun. I’ve only owned one in my career, but when I carried it I felt as though I was the mightiest warrior walking the face of the planet, afraid of neither man nor beast.

The time was the late 1970’s and I was nineteen years old. I was armed with this hand cannon and I had the authority to use it. That my friends is a scary thought, even to me. Now days you must be twenty one, undergo a battery of both mental and physical evaluations and successfully complete an approved police academy of at least 1600 classroom hours. Back when I started you were sworn in, handed a badge and a gun and told to go get the bad guys. Barney Fife was on TV and I had that role model and 80 hours of reserve officer training to work with.

Sometime in the next twelve months I had to complete a basic 240 hour police academy with a passing grade of 70% to get my peace officer license from the great State of Texas. Anyway back to the Model #29. This particular gun came from a very highly respected and wise old Sergeant named Lindsey Carlton of the League City Police department. He was in my opinion a top notch cop and a good friend to me. This was back in the time of the “wonder nine” pistols. These were high capacity auto loading pistols that were becoming very popular in law enforcement circles and I had already bought myself one. It was a 9mm blued version and I think it had a 15 round magazine. As usual I didn’t really think through my purchase and soon found that the back strap of the weapon that has the most contact with your sweaty palm had started to show signs of rust.

Sgt. Carlton was a big fellow and he had an affinity for large bore revolvers, however he also wanted my S & W model #59, so we worked out a trade. For some reason during our phone conversation about the deal he mistakenly believed that my model #59 was the hard chromed version. I am absolutely sure I didn’t lie to the man, because I respected him way too much for that and that wasn’t something that I could have hidden anyway. Well I trekked over to his house, (a palatial mansion for the day on a cops salary I thought), and we went about the dickering process. I un-wrapped the model #59 from the original brown waxed paper that protected it from rust, in the blue and silver trimmed Smith and Wesson box that had accompanied it from the factory of its birth. A normally jovial type person, I was surprised when I saw Lindsey’s face take on a sour look. He said, “I thought you told me that this was a Nickel plated model?” I stammered and stuttered and vehemently denied that I’d said it was nickel plated during our phone conservation, because I honestly think I told him what it was.

We dickered back and forth like an experienced horse trader and a wanna be cowboy there for a while as Lindsey scrutinized the Model #59 and I went over the Model #29. It had a short barrel of about 4″ and was quite heavy. What first caught my attention was the finish on the hand cannon. It wasn’t new by any stretch of the imagination and had been refinished. Now days it would be called a matte chrome finish or Colt fans would call it a Colt Guard finish. The #29 had the standard factory wooden stocks and a white outline rear sight and the blaze ramp style front sight that I’d already decided I liked in my short law enforcement tenure. Well it took a full glass of sweet tea, one blued Smith and Wesson Model #59 still in the original box and 75.00 hard earned extra job dollars (that my new Boss wasn’t aware I had squirreled away), but I had my model #29 and was on my way.

I went home and showed the new prize to the quite pregnant Boss and she wasn’t all that impressed. I don’t really think she had ever seen a “Dirty Harry” movie at that time, so she had no idea of the cool factor I had just achieved. Well when you get a new gun, you have to buy ammo for it so we loaded up in the family car, a 3/4 ton Chevy single cab pick-up truck that I had owned when we married. The Boss was multi-talented and could drive the manual transmission hay hauler with no problems, but as unborn #1 child grew that all changed, but that’s another story. Off to Marburger’s Sporting Goods we went, where I “badged” the clerk and he didn’t check my age. I bought a fifty round box of 240 grain Remington .44 magnum hollow point cannon ammo. Ok, now what’s any self respecting new gun owner with a box of fresh ammo first priority? To go shoot the damn thing and see how it works.

Back then we were newly married and the Boss was game for most anything, so we drove back to one of the most remote areas in Seabrook on Port road. There was nothing out there but pasture, so I wasn’t afraid of damaging anything. We drove out and parked along side of the road and with the Boss waiting in the truck acting as the lookout, I test fired the .44 by shooting into a bar ditch. I warned the Boss to hold her ears because I assumed it would be loud and I wasn’t disappointed. I touched off a round and a blue and yellow flame bellowed out of that weapon for what the Boss assured me was about 18″. Remember I hadn’t had any formal training on handguns at this point, so I didn’t know about sound deadening ear plugs or ear muffs that you’re supposed to wear when you shoot. I was raised in the country, you just went shooting. For the next round I kind of used my shoulder to protect one ear and stuck my left index finger in the other ear and I made the mistake of shooting the mighty Model #29 with one hand.

I was not too long out of high school where my favorite class was recess. During recess all I was required to do was lift weights and get ready for the next football season, so I got away with firing the nard kicking short barrel hand cannon once. I assure you, I never fired it one handed again though. It was for sure a two fisted handgun, especially with magnum loads. Well now that I was armed with what I called “Thor’s Hammer”, I feared no man or critter. Feeling that I had the power of the mighty Greek God “Thor” and the blessing of the Lord Jesus Christ at my beck and call, I was good to go. So being the “I gotta have the latest and best kinda of cop” that I am, I set about acquiring all of the latest accruements for my new handgun. Back then we all wore either plain black leather or basketweave designed Sam Browns (gun belt), so this called for a trip to Houston to the F-15 police supply on Washington Avenue.

I bought a high rise lined thumb break plain black leather holster and a loop type ammo holder. (That’s a device that held 12 rounds of ammo on your gun belt and allowed you quick access for reloading.) I was now loaded for bear. I carried this gun for many months until the time came that I had to use it. Don’t panic I didn’t kill anybody; I was forced to shoot a raccoon. By forced, I mean that I had gotten a direct order to shoot this raccoon from the Chief of Police. I was aware of the penetrating power of the .44 magnum round. We were in an urban setting, but a citizen called the Chief and said that he had a problem with raccoons in his attic. So being the night officer I was sent over to shoot this raccoon.

Here’s what happened.

The homeowner and I were standing in the yard on the side of his house in an overgrown field. He pointed up to his attic and said “that’s where they will come out when I use a mop handle to make noise and drive them out”. I explained that I would not shoot towards his house, but if he would scare the raccoons out of the attic I’d take the shot if I got the chance. Well sure enough a big ole boar raccoon came out of the attic and jumped across onto a tree limb out near where I was standing. The homeowner returned and I asked him to hold my flashlight on the raccoon so I could shoot it. Well this wasn’t such a good idea because I realized without the flashlight, I couldn’t see the sights on the big Smith and Wesson. By this time I had watched enough T. J. Hooker episodes on television that I managed to hold the flashlight in my left hand and the revolver in my right, using the opposing force hold to brace my gun. I thumbed cocked the big cannon into the single action mode and took careful aim.

Ka-Boom.

Flames and smoke belched out of the muzzle and I could see that I had hit the big old raccoon in the stomach area because that portion of his body was no longer there. I had heard old men tell me that there was no critter as tough as a old boar raccoon, but I couldn’t believe what I saw next. The ole raccoon simply climbed down out of the tree, sneered at us, calmly walked over and climbed over a six foot chain link fence, then disappeared into the woods. People have asked me why I didn’t shoot again, but remember we were in an urban district and shooting horizontally would almost guarantee hitting someone’s house, so I chose to be careful despite what the Chief had told me. By the way that was the last raccoon call I made there, so apparently the ole boy was mortally wounded.

I kept my pet hand cannon till I moved to a larger department that mandated revolvers no larger than a .357 magnum, but I sure missed “Thor’s Hammer”. It was my first Model 29 and due to my retirement and advanced arthritis, it’s probably my last. Till next time grip it with both hands, aim true, and join the NRA to protect your gun rights. If you like this column you can email me at juniorsboy@santafegoodnews.com because the Boss likes it when I get fan mail.
Juniors Boy

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The Good Life is…

Posted on October 23, 2015 by in Magazine Issues

The Good Life is… letting our spirit live in the forefront of our lives!

Join us this issue & please feel free to share the magazine with anyone you know that needs some encouragement. 

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Summertime Fun!

Posted on August 25, 2015 by in Magazine Issues

Summertime FUN has been created just for you! Please enjoy & feel free to SHARE it with anyone who needs some encouragement today!

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Making the GOOD LIFE a Reality…

Posted on June 9, 2015 by in Magazine Issues

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Please enjoy our Special Feature on the GOOD LIFE in this issue. We exist to encourage people to grab life with both hands & help each other along the long road home.

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Life is Better Outside

Posted on January 17, 2015 by in Magazine Issues

150101 Click Here to enjoy this issue.

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Celebrating the Seasons of Our Lives

Posted on November 6, 2014 by in Magazine Issues

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Please enjoy this exciting issue as we try to make the most of the live God has given us! Remember you can ALWAYS SHARE the GOOD NEWS with anyone you like – it’s FREE and we don’t mind a bit!
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